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    Advisor and mentor to everyone from billionaire CEOs to Midwest soccer moms, Tony Robbins finds serenity in his new South Florida home.

    Tony Robbins
    Tony Robbins at his home in West Palm Beach.

    “I’m looking straight down onto turquoise blue waters—the Gulf Stream is less than a mile out, the color is amazing. Boats are going by. The temperature is 75 degrees. It’s as idyllic as you can imagine. Even the waves—it’s like I can reach out and grab them.”

    No, this is not some visualization exercise from a motivational speaker; this is Tony Robbins’s reality. Robbins is sitting five feet from the edge of his West Palm Beach property, which was hard-won by strategic thinking, and subsequent action, over the course of a three-decade career. Global power players such as former President Bill Clinton, investor Paul Tudor Jones, and actor Hugh Jackman have paid him upwards of seven figures for his mentorship; his life events pack stadiums; and his books, including the recently released Money: Master the Game: 7 Simple Steps to Financial Freedom, are New York Times best sellers. Robbins is the biggest life coach in the world—both figuratively and literally—he sprouted up 10 inches in high school, to a towering 6-foot-7 (the result, he would find out later in life, of a pituitary tumor).

    Robbins rose to fame in the ’80s in part from the ubiquitous marathon of infomercials, but he bristles at the mere mention of the word “motivational.” “I am not a motivator, never have been; motivation to me is a warm bath you ought to take or you stink—but I am a strategist,” says Robbins, 55. “If all you are is somebody motivated, running east looking for a sunset, I don’t give a shit how motivated you are, you’re going nowhere without strategy.”

    His knack for clear-headed thinking and his larger-than-life personality have helped him get serious results for millions of people. “I turn around businesses in a year or 18 months; I turn around individuals, their bodies; I turn around people emotionally. I recently met a Marine who got back from Afghanistan with PTSD—if I can turn him around, that is my life’s work.”

    Tony Robbins
    Robbins was a speaker on Oprah Winfrey’s Lifeclass, where he talked about “living fearlessly,” at Radio City Music Hall in 2012.

    Strategic thinking also landed him his current $25 million six-bedroom West Palm Beach mansion. The California native—who has homes dotted around the world (including the number one-rated resort in Fiji)—decided to settle in South Florida in 2013 after an exhaustive search for more tax-friendly locales. “When California raised the income tax rate to the upper end, I was okay with that, but when they made it retroactive, I said this is out of control; it just pushed me over the edge. I’m only there 90 days a year, at most.”

    The topic of money and its impact on everyday citizens has been top of mind for the guy whom Forbes calls “the CEO Whisperer” ever since the financial collapse of 2008. He has dined with the Dalai Lama, walked on fire with Oprah, and personally coached three of the past five US presidents. “I grew up dirt poor—‘when you went out to get the car and it was gone’ kind of poor,” he says. “I went through four fathers, or my mother did, and in my mind it was all tied to finance.”

    Watching the Oscar-winning documentary Inside Job about the banking industry’s role in the financial meltdown was his final straw. He didn’t just get mad—he got to work. “I thought, I have a unique gift: I have access. I coached one of the top-10 financial traders in the history of the world, Paul Tudor Jones, for 21 straight years, every day. I thought, What if I interview 50 of the most brilliant minds in the financial world?”

    For his November 2014 release, Money: Master the Game, his first major book since 1991’s blockbuster Awaken the Giant Within, he turned to the masters themselves, gleaning specific, actionable advice and steps from financial kingpins such as billionaire investor Carl Icahn and Vanguard Group founder John C. Bogle. “What’s cool about the book is it takes the greatest minds on Wall Street and brings it to Main Street,” he says, in language “soccer moms and kids just getting out of college” can access.

    Robbins has donated all author proceeds, plus an additional personal contribution, to feed 50 million meals to people in need, via Feeding America, the largest domestic hunger relief charity, and an organization close to his heart. “When I was 11, we had no money for food on Thanksgiving. This man showed up at my house with bags of food and an uncooked turkey, and he changed my life. It wasn’t the food; it was the idea that strangers cared. That event shaped me more than anything else.”

    Also part of Robbins’s teachings are his regular live events, including the weekend-long Unleash the Power Within or five-day Date With Destiny at the Boca Raton Resort & Club. Gatherings are regularly scheduled for Fiji, New York, Chicago, and Las Vegas, but West Palm Beach will always be home. “It was just the pure serenity and beauty that made me settle here,” he says. “I’ve got water on both sides of my property, and I’ve got a 50-foot boat dock; I can go wherever I want.” And he does.


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    Miami Beach mayor Philip Levine prepares for his city’s centennial.

    Philip Levine
    Miami Beach Mayor Philip Levine on South Pointe Pier.

    Walk into Miami Beach City Hall these days and you might do a double take: The fourth-floor chambers of the mayor and city commissioners have undergone a dramatic makeover, personally overseen and paid for by Mayor Philip Levine, who is currently in his second year of office after one of the most tumultuous (and certainly the most expensive) campaigns in the city’s 100-year history.

    Rather than the standard-issue 1970s municipal drab of yore, City Hall’s fourth floor now features floor-to-ceiling, life-size photos of iconic leaders and inspirational quotes from such notables as the late Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir (chosen by Commissioner Micky Steinberg to grace her office’s doorway) and former US President George Bush in his WWII-era fighter pilot days (selected by Commissioner Jonah Wolfson to greet his visitors). The overall feeling is less of a gray warren of government offices and more of a new dot-com start-up, which is precisely the point.

    Currently on the mayor’s checklist: a citywide party. For Miami Beach’s 100th birthday this month, Levine says to expect four days of special events “celebrating our leading role in fashion, music, architecture, style, and design,” culminating on Thursday, March 26, with a free concert on the sand off Ocean Drive. “Every time we talk about adding another star, our police chief and our city manager roll their eyes,” he says about the concert lineup. “They’re terrified about having another Woodstock here.” Still, he admits he’s hoping to top the 120,000-strong crowd that turned out for a free 1995 concert in the same spot by the Italian tenor Luciano Pavarotti.

    Within City Hall itself, Levine has reversed course from the previous mayoral administration. A police force seen as deeply dysfunctional found itself with the aforementioned new reform-minded chief as well as a new second in command—both hired from outside Miami with an explicit mandate to clean house. In the wake of code enforcement and building department corruption scandals, the new city manager was similarly empowered to dig through records and flag questionable deals and conspicuously unpaid bills. No less worrying, Levine says, was the combination of dramatically rising sea levels and a decrepit drainage system, leaving much of South Beach regularly looking like a biblical reenactment. “Our streets were flooded, [and there was] no plan, no vision on how to fix that, just a sense of hopelessness that we could do anything about it,” he argues. To that end, new pumping stations have since been installed around the city to push water back into the bay—a pricey remedy, but one Levine believes to be essential in addressing climate change.

    Flood control is also important to the Beach constituents who put Levine in office. “I don’t call them residents; I call them customers,” says the mayor. “We have 90,000 customers.” Considering his citizens as customers and extending his business instincts to the public sector hasn’t always gone over well for Levine. In fact, during his 2013 mayoral bid, many observers questioned why he wanted the job in the first place. On the heels of the reported $300 million sale of his cruise industry media firm, his launch of a new cruise line-focused company, a slew of splashy real estate deals, dates with models and TV stars, and not least, jetting around the country alongside Bill Clinton, a beachside mayoralty seemed like a sidetrack to his life.

    “Anyone who knows me knows I’m a pothole mayor,” Levine says with a laugh, insisting that he thrives on micromanaging, even down to personally intervening in roadwork. He recalls driving down the Beach’s Alton Road during last December’s Art Basel (which attracted one of its largest crowds ever) just after he’d publicly promised all of the street’s lanes would be open for the fair’s traffic onslaught. Suddenly he was greeted with the sight of an orange menace: “They’d put cones up in one lane! I got out of the car and I personally threw all the cones onto the sidewalk. [I then] called the CEO of the construction company and the [city’s] director of public works,” he continues with a grimace. “They responded by saying that it was a total mistake; they’d get the cones cleared in one hour. I told them not to worry because I’d gotten it done in three minutes.”

    The Beach’s never-ending construction woes aside, it’s hard not to be impressed with at least some of what’s been accomplished under Levine’s tenure. Previous plans for drastically expanding the city’s convention center redo with an accompanying high-end retail and condo complex—and with more than $500 million in public money funding the project—have been spiked. Instead, a more modest renovation of only the convention center is underway. “We’re a boutique destination,” Levine explains. “We are not a massive international convention center town. That’s Vegas. And we don’t want to be Vegas.”

    Spoiler alert: Levine is running for reelection in November. And with three of the city’s six commissioners termed out of office and their seats in play, Levine says he’ll once again be devoting his considerable resources to supporting kindred candidates—and maintaining a solid majority of votes in support of his vision for the city. His next big project? Stopping the expansion of casino gaming, which he sees as an existential threat to the future of not only the Beach but all of South Florida. “The world loves Miami, the world’s coming to Miami,” he says. “The only thing we can do is mess it up.”


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    The greatest doubles team in tennis history, Floridians Bob and Mike Bryan gear up for this month’s Miami Open.

    Bob and Mike Bryan
    Bob and Mike Bryan in their West Coast home in Camarillo, California. The brothers won their 100th doubles title at last year’s US Open.

    One might imagine the childhoods of Bob and Mike Bryan—identical twin brothers who’ve broken almost every record in tennis doubles history—to have been Tiger Woods-esque. In actuality, the boys’ parents took the opposite approach, encouraging them to “fall in love” with the sport as fans before allowing them on the court. “They definitely used side-door motivation,” says Mike. “Our love for the sport is why we are still playing tennis today at [the age of] 36.”

    The fact that the twins spent the first 30 years of their lives honing their game together didn’t hurt either. “We developed as a tight unit,” says Bob, who believes each brother took advantage of the other’s strengths to escalate his own abilities. “I had the number-one player in the country right down the hall to hit with every day... You don’t want to be the worse twin; you want to carry your weight on the court.”

    The men also credit their idol, Andre Agassi, for developing their desire to win, even copying the pink spandex shorts he wore. Today the Bryans consider Agassi a close friend. Mike competed against him at the 2001 US Open—his only Grand Slam singles match—and lost. “I was so nervous trying to figure out a way to beat this guy who was just a god to me,” Mike says. Echoes Bob, “[Agassi was] basically the reason we played tennis.”

    Bob and Mike Bryan
    Bob and Mike practicing their game at Spanish Hills Country Club in preparation for this month’s Miami Open in Key Biscayne.

    Last year, the brothers earned their 100th career title—the most of any doubles team in history—at the 2014 US Open. And although they felt it was a dream come true, it also came as “kind of a relief,” says Mike, due to the intense media buildup surrounding their milestone achievement.

    As the brothers prepare for this month’s Miami Open, the men credit their strict nutrition regimen for giving them an edge on the court. Mike led them into gluten-free diets roughly 10 years ago, and they’ve both felt major improvements since. Mike also depends on Vega Sport supplements, fish oil, and Chinese herbs to maintain his good health. “I feel better now [at 36] than I did at 25,” he notes.

    Mike, who currently lives in Tampa, says he’ll join his brother in Miami ahead of the tournament because “I feel like there’s a little piece missing” when he’s away from his twin for too long. Their bond is so strong, in fact, that Mike admits it can arouse a little jealousy in their wives. “That’s a factor we have to negotiate, but they’re just going to have to deal with it,” he jokes.

    Down the road, the Bryans also aim to compete in the 2016 Olympics in Rio, which Mike says, “is what we view as maybe our swan song.” After that, they will consider careers as college tennis coaches or potentially starting an academy. After all, says Bob, “Tennis is our life, it’s really what we’re experts at.” The Miami Open takes place Monday, March 23, through Sunday, April 5, at Crandon Park Tennis Center, 7300 Crandon Blvd., Key Biscayne; for tickets, call 305-442-3367 or visit miamiopen.com.


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    Our timeline of Miami Beach's first 100 years. 

    Miami Beach in 1923.
    The beach at the Roman Pools bathing casino in 1923.

    1915: Miami Beach is incorporated as a city on March 26, 1915. 

    1921: James Allison, a friend of pioneer developer Carl Fisher, studies stone crabs at his marine research center on Fifth Street at the bay. Joe Weiss, of Joe’s Stone Crab, puts stone crabs on his menu, launching a culinary cult.

    1924: The Deauville Hotel at 63rd Street and Collins Avenue opens with a nearly million-gallon pool.

    1925: The local population stands at more than 15,000, up from 600 people in 1920.

    1926: The Great Miami Hurricane, with 125-mph winds, kills 113 people. Many deaths are due to flimsy 1920s boom-time construction.

    Rosie the elephant was used as a golf tee in one of Carl Fisher’s publicity stunts to bring people to Miami Beach in 1927.
    Rosie the elephant was used as a golf tee in one of Carl Fisher’s publicity stunts to bring people to Miami Beach in 1927.

    1927: Rosie the elephant, Carl Fisher’s marketing gimmick, is used as a prop for an Easter egg hunt.

    1929: President-elect Herbert Hoover visits Miami Beach.

    1933:The Miami Beach Times publishes a long list of delinquent taxpayers.

    1935: 13,350 are residents of Miami Beach proper.

    1936: The Chicago Tribune declares that Miami and Miami Beach have more gambling than any other city in the United States.

    1937: The Miami Herald publishes a list of wintering gangsters, including Joe Adonis and Frank Costello.

    1940: The Miami Beach Jewish Center opens.

    1941: Moon over Miami debuts, with Betty Grable as a gold-digger declaring that “rich men are as plentiful as grapefruit, and millionaires hang from every palm tree” in Miami.

    1941: Zorita the stripper goes onstage with a live boa constrictor.

    1942: The first wave of Army Air Corps trainees, including Clark Gable, arrives in Miami Beach during WWII.

    1950: Senator Estes Kefauver investigates Miami gambling, part of a nationwide crackdown on organized crime. Miami Beach’s population approaches 46,300.

    1951: Actor Ronald Reagan appears onstage at Copa City for a Sophie Tucker birthday celebration.

    1954: Morris Lapidus’s Fontainebleau hotel opens, with Patti Page singing the “Fontainebleau Waltz” in the La Ronde room.

    1955: The shah of Iran comes to Miami Beach with his wife, Empress Soraya.

    1957: Notorious jewel thief Jack “Murf the Surf” Murphy works as an acrobatic pool performer at the Versailles Hotel.

    1959: Fidel Castro’s coup in Cuba brings an influx of Cubans to Miami Beach.

    The Beatles performing live on The Ed Sullivan Show from Miami Beach to a record television audience of more than 50 million people in 1964.
    The Beatles performing live on The Ed Sullivan Show from Miami Beach to a record television audience of more than 50 million people in 1964.

    1964: The Beatles appear on The Ed Sullivan Show at the Deauville, bringing the Youthquake revolution to Miami Beach.

    1968: The 1920s Roney Plaza hotel at 23rd and Collins is torn down, with Jane Fisher, Carl Fisher’s former wife, presiding over the demolition.

    1968: The Republican National Convention is held in Miami Beach.

    1969: The Jackie Gleason Show ends its five-year run at a facility now known as the Jackie Gleason Theater at The Fillmore Miami Beach.

    1972: The Democratic and Republican conventions are held in Miami Beach.

    1979: Miami Beach’s Art Deco District is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    1980: The Mariel boatlift brings an estimated 140,000 Cubans to South Florida.

    1983: Scarface, starring Al Pacino as drug lord Tony Montana, is released in theaters.

    1985: Miami City Ballet is founded on Lincoln Road.

    1985: Fontainebleau founder Ben Novack dies.

    1985: Mel Mendelson runs for mayor with the campaign slogan “Enough already!”

    1987: Michael Tilson Thomas, in conjunction with Lin and Ted Arison, launches the New World Symphony at the Lincoln Theatre on Lincoln Road.

    1990: Luther “Uncle Luke” Campbell, a South Beach regular, becomes a cause célèbre when 2 Live Crew is arrested on obscenity charges; Campbell successfully takes a free-speech case to the US Supreme Court.

    1990: Barbara Capitman, the seminal Art Deco activist, dies.

    1992: Hurricane Andrew strikes South Florida causing more than $30 billion in damage.

    1992: Gianni Versace bought the old Amsterdam Palace apartment building on Ocean Drive and promptly turned it into a notorious mansion, Casa Casuarina. 

    First issue of Ocean Drive.
    The first cover of Ocean Drive, January 1993.

    1993:Ocean Drive magazine launches.

    1997: Andrew Cunanan kills Gianni Versace at Casa Casuarina.

    2002: After a year’s delay due to 9/11, Art Basel in Miami Beach debuts.

    2008 Victoria’s Secret fashion show.

    2008: Victoria’s Secret delivered all of its Angels to the Fontainebleau hotel for the brand’s world-famous fashion show. 

    2007: The Great Recession guts the US economy, and undermines the condo-flipping real estate boom in Miami and Miami Beach.

    2012: The Bee Gees’ Robin Gibb dies; Gibb and his wife lived in Miami Beach for more than two decades.

    2013: Miami native Richard Blanco serves as the inaugural poet for President Obama’s second inauguration.

    2014: Miami and Manhattan were the only North American cities listed among the “10 most important global cities to the world’s wealthy” in the 2014 Wealth Report issued by London-based Knight Frank, beating out Paris, Beijing, and Dubai. “Even after 100 years, we’ve only just begun. This is a fantastic time to be in Miami,“ says über developer Jorge Pérez of The Related Group, who has no fewer than 300 buildings standing or in development in Miami. “We are making history for the next 100 years at a pace never before experienced. The best is yet to come.”

    2015: March 26, 2015: Miami Beach celebrates its 100th anniversary with fireworks, a free New World Symphony concert, and festivities throughout the beach.


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    As the madness of Music Week hits Miami, Ocean Drive takes a behind-the-scenes look at the hidden life of world-famous DJs.

    Miami DJs
    Dutch EDM DJ R3hab working the crowd with beats at Miami Beach nightclub Story.

    From the dance floor looking up, the life of a DJ seems fantastic. They travel around the world, sipping Champagne on private jets, then crack their knuckles and take their post behind a motherboard of buttons that sends trance-inducing beats bursting out of speakers the size of a Honda, while confetti shoots out from cannons, dancers fall from the sky, and lasers shoot across a dance floor. Afterward, they party with celebrities until the sun comes up. If it feels like a fantasy, it’s because it is one.

    It’s 8:30 pm on a Friday night, in a town sluggish from an intense December and January that blended Art Basel into a New Year’s Eve party into a high season that seemed to last forever. Everything is moving a little bit slower in Miami as the city recovers. The exception is a man by the name of R3hab (aka Fadil El Ghoul), a 27-year-old Dutch EDM DJ who arrived in Miami on a flight from Amsterdam after a stop in London. He races to check into his room at Epic Hotel in downtown Miami in order to catch a minute of alone time before his journey of a night begins.

    But it’s too late—90 minutes on a tarmac, plus an hour in customs, means the nap will have to wait until tomorrow. “The hard thing about traveling is that it’s just tiring,” he says. “There’s no direct flight from Amsterdam, and it doesn’t matter if you’re in first class, business class, or coach, it all sucks when it’s 10 hours.”

    Unshaven and with hair purposely disheveled, R3hab wheels a carry-on-size bag through the hotel hallway and clutches a six-pack of pressed juices. Hanging on his shoulder is a backpack containing every necessity in life—his laptop, Bose noise-canceling headphones, and an eye mask and neck pillow for that rest he so desperately craves. “This is a nice room,” he says, before pushing aside three cupcakes left as compliments of the hotel. “Eating healthy is very important.”

    RELATED: What Lenny Kravitz thinks of his daughter Zoë Kravitz's music >>

    Both Avicii and Afrojack were hospitalized during last year’s Miami Music Week, proving that, if you let it, deejaying can be a dangerous sport. “It’s important to stay in shape and eat healthy because we’re always on a plane,” says internationally celebrated DJ Cedric Gervais, who estimates he travels 270 days a year. “If you don’t eat healthy and you don’t work out, you’re going to get sick and you’re going to miss gigs.” Missing gigs is obviously not something that arguably the world’s most popular DJ right now, Calvin Harris, did last year—Harris raked in an estimated $66 million last year, according to Forbes.

    On this day, there’s no time for workouts. A classic creative type, R3hab produces when the feeling hits him, and that time happens to be right now. He hunches over his laptop, hands moving like a classical music conductor as the music spills out and he puts together his set for the night. The procrastination is all part of the creative process. “I’ve played a big festival for 50,000 people and didn’t really prepare, and then two hours before, it clicks and it’s all done in a magical hour,” he says. “Or I can sit there and try to prepare three weeks ahead and nothing comes. When you start worrying about these things, then it doesn’t fall into place.”

    Miami DJs
    R3hab at Story.

    The music is only part of the package when it comes to a DJ performance. “There are multiple things that we look at when we decide which new guys we are going to try and push forward,” says Adam Russakoff, executive producer/director of business affairs and talent buyer of Ultra Music Festival. “One of which would be music. Second, which is really important to me, would be the performance—the engagement of the crowd, the energy that they bring and how they present the material.”

    As R3hab hops into a chauffeured SUV with his tour manager, Wisa, his energy is fading. He has a show at Story nightclub in a couple of hours, and his eyes start to close during the car ride. Keeping him awake is Instagram (R3hab himself has 383,000 followers and counting), an obsession for most here in America, but part of the job for DJs from around the world. “Branding is the biggest thing, and with today’s technology, social media is a big part of that,” says Brooke Evers, an Australian model-turned-DJ with 295,000 Instagram followers and several magazine covers under her belt. “Promoters always say, ‘Can you put the flier on your social media?’ They don’t ask about anything else.”

    R3hab was part of a group of Dutch DJs such as Hardwell, Nicky Romero, Afrojack, Chuckie, Laidback Luke, and others who exploded onto the music scene from the same generation. “Afrojack was the one to really pop off internationally,” he says. “He saw a certain talent in me, took me under his wing in 2011, and we started working together, and everything slowly came along.”

    RELATED: Our guide to the seven-day Miami weekend >>

    Gervais, a Miami resident for 17 years, had a more old-school approach. He was the resident DJ at Living Room, Nikki Beach, and then Space before getting noticed and climbing the ranks. “That way is dead,” says Gervais, who now has multiplatinum-selling singles and a Grammy on his résumé. “Today, you have to make a big record and get signed to a label or with an agent. Being a resident in a club is not going to take you anywhere. But I’m glad that I had to make people dance every night. Today all these young kids that are coming up are missing the experience of being a real DJ and actually knowing how to play for a crowd.”

    With technology the way it is, almost anyone can be a DJ. Software is cheap, the Internet makes the music accessible, and social media allows for a brand to be created all from the comfort of an aspiring star’s home. “The barriers to entry to be a successful artist are all but removed these days,” says Russakoff. “What I like about it is it allows anybody with some musical ability to get creative with all the tools that are available to them. Money isn’t a factor anymore, which is great. It’s purely talent-based.”

    Becoming a successful DJ is a different story. The fact that it’s so easy to give it a shot makes competition fierce and saturates the market. “It’s very difficult for anyone without the right backing to make it now,” says Louis Diaz, talent buyer/musical director for Space Miami and The Opium Group. “I stay away from the up-and-coming. I book shows that sell, and for them to sell, they’ve been proven over and over again.”

    Miami DJs
    A late meal (his first of the day) at Michael Mina 74 gives him the chance to kick back with friends before his gig.

    Which means those already in the inner circle, like R3hab, don’t have to focus on the competition. “It’s a waste of time and energy,” the DJ says as his car pulls up to the Fontainebleau for a pregig meal. It’s now 11 pm (or 5 am Amsterdam time) and R3hab sits down for his first meal of the day at Michael Mina 74. “It’s a 15-hour diet,” he jokes before he and Wisa tuck into roasted bone marrow, a Japanese wedge salad, Michael’s tuna tartare, lamb meatballs, filet mignon, grilled Colorado lamb chops, and white miso sea bass.

    The energy changes with the help of a good meal and the arrival of Biz Martinez, the music director and talent buyer for LIV and Story, two of the top-10-grossing clubs in America, which reportedly pulled in more than $70 million last year. All of a sudden, R3hab has a friend and his spirits are lifted. They crack jokes at each other’s expense and talk about typical guy stuff. Then Mo Garcia and Purple—two of the people who make LIV and Story tick—show up, and it’s a party.

    “If you can make them feel comfortable, they’re going to play better,” says Martinez. “These guys are constantly traveling, and they want to see a familiar face; they want to feel like they’re at home. How we host them and how we execute their vision in the market is why they continue to come back.”

    By the time R3hab, Martinez, and company roll up to the back alley of Story, then head up the stairs to the back of the stage, it’s 1:30 am. It feels like the night should be over, but somehow it’s just beginning. “The way I look at it, deejaying is the dessert for the meal,” says DJ Michael Brun. “It’s the most immediately gratifying experience of being a DJ and producer.”

    RELATED: Where you'll spot Cedric Gervais and Michael Brun between gigs >>

    Within seconds, R3hab is working the crowd with beats. At first they stare in amazement, snapping photos at a rapid pace, but then he lifts his hands to the heavens and the thousand or so people in the packed house start dancing like no one is watching. As the night ticks on, sweat pours off the brow of R3hab, who at this point hasn’t had any real sleep in roughly 24 hours. Fans screaming at the top of their lungs makes the job seem more shvitz and clamor than glitz and glamour, but models do meander into the DJ booth to say hello and remind him why he loves Miami, and servers parade around roughly two dozen bottles of Dom Pérignon throughout his set to buyers at prime tables on the dance floor who are adding to their previous purchases of vodka and tequila.

    Painted girls dance, lights flash in sync with the music, and confetti drops at just the right times throughout the night. The don of LIV and Story, David Grutman, pats R3hab on the back as he kicks into a second gear, and Jojo Lahoud and Mo Garcia keep the VIP crowd partying. “Miami is a huge stop for any DJ,” says Sujit Kundu, owner of Skam Artist, an agency that represents talent who regularly make their way to Miami. “Clubs like LIV, Mansion, Story, and Wall put Miami on the map.” They also set the trends for clubs around the globe.

    Miami DJs
    In 2013, Ultra Music Festival sold out both of its weekends, with more than 330,000 people in attendance.

    “I really don’t think anyone in the world offers the programming we do in terms of all the superstars that we have and all the upcoming artists,” says Martinez. “LIV is one of the most well-known clubs in the world,” adds Brun, who first played there in February 2013. “To be able to headline there was a big deal. It’s a milestone. When you are able to headline at LIV, you’re at a certain point in your career, and it increases your overall value on the market.”

    And as we roll through 2015, the sounds will change—less noise and more deep house and chill vibes, according to industry insiders—and the stars will move up and down the charts, but Miami will continue to set the tone, especially with Winter Music Conference and Ultra Music Festival, in their 30th year and 17th year respectively. In 2013, Ultra sold out both of its weekends with a combined total of more than 330,000 people in attendance from 95 countries.

    “Being the first festival of the year and arguably the most credible EDM festival in the US, artists invest a lot of their time, effort, and energy into using Ultra Miami as a showcase to lay out their path and set what their message is going to be for the year,” says Russakoff. The message sent on this night was that the party stops for nothing. R3hab blasts the EDM tracks and ignites the crowd until 4:30 am. He jumps, he dances, somehow finding a spark after all his travels. “I think you feed off the energy of the room,” he says as he steps out of the DJ booth and down into the bowels of Story nightclub. “I was a little jet-lagged and tired, but the good thing about music is it gives you energy.”

    After the show, that bed in the high-end Epic Hotel has to wait. Adrenaline keeps R3hab up at least an extra two hours after a set. So on this night, his head won’t even hit the pillow. Instead he’ll party with Jojo and some of those models from earlier, in the VIP green room of Story. He’d keep going, except there’s a 7 am flight to catch to Las Vegas for another show, where surely a nap is on the agenda. Because after a night in Miami, there’s no better place to sleep than Vegas.


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    Ocean Drive looks back at a century of history—from the ambitious pioneer to the celebrities to the scandals, plus all the food, real estate, art, and nightlife that have made the beach what it is today.

    PART I: The First 50 Years

    An overhead view of Ocean Drive, Lummus Park, and the beach, circa 1935.
    An overhead view of Ocean Drive, Lummus Park, and the beach, circa 1935.

    One hundred years ago, the Miami Beach we know today was merely a dream. Carl Fisher, an eccentric millionaire with an affinity for fast cars and wild parties, was vacationing in Miami when he looked at the barren barrier island from across the bay and saw its potential. Maybe he even envisioned an old-time version of what everyone who visits Miami Beach today experiences on a daily (and nightly) basis—the beautiful models splashing around the Atlantic Ocean, the millionaires reveling at the grand hotels. Today, a century after Miami Beach was incorporated, on March 26, 1915, it’s safe to say Fisher’s dreams came true, and then some.

    There had been great men before Fisher: Henry and Charles Lum, T.J. Pancoast, the Lummus brothers, and of course John S. Collins all had big hopes for the strip of beach, but it was Fisher who came in, funded the completion of Collins Bridge in 1913, and turned mangroves and farmland into a vacation getaway. “Fisher had a great vision,” says Paul S. George, a Wolfson historian at HistoryMiami and a history professor at Miami Dade College. “He wanted to create a great playground for the affluent, so he took on projects that were big and costly, but for him the sky was the limit in terms of imagination.”

    RELATED: Miami's history as told by vintage postcards >>

    From the start, Fisher sold Miami Beach with wild promotions. He had earned his fortune by selling cars and manufacturing the first bright headlights, and his fame by building the Indianapolis Motor Speedway and ultimately creating the Indy 500. He also loved a good spectacle. Fisher gave away land to anyone willing to build a home, and brought in circus elephants, beauty queens, and President Warren G. Harding to promote the city. “This was a man who walked on a tightrope between two buildings to promote his car dealership, so the elephant thing was really small potatoes for Fisher,” says George. “But that’s what he brought to Miami Beach—a craziness.”

    The city as we know it today began to take shape almost immediately. The Browns Hotel (currently home to the famed Prime 112 restaurant) was said to be Miami Beach’s first hotel, and the Jungle Inn, located in what was then literally a jungle at 67th and Indian Creek Drive, was the first speakeasy. But it was Fisher who opened the $2 million Flamingo Hotel (located where the rebuilt Flamingo apartments are today) on New Year’s Eve in 1920 with a soirée that rivaled any of today’s holiday fêtes, setting the stage for the Beach to be America’s party town.

    In those days, the wealthy owned cars, so Miami Beach quickly developed a system of drivable roads, with other services following. “People were coming down here and they needed tires,” says Barbara Katzen, 80, whose parents moved to Miami in 1924 and opened both the Norton Tire Company and eventually the first car rental company in Miami Beach. “Cars were always status symbols; there were a lot of chauffeur-driven cars where the madam would shop and bring her packages back to the cars.”

    Fisher laid the groundwork for what Lincoln Road would become by building a hotel on the famous street. His actions jump-started a tourism boom that saw more than 50 hotels, replete with beachfront bathing facilities, dining, and dancing, open their doors. Places such as Smith’s Casino, Hardie’s Casino, and the Miami Beach Casino began to thrive. “The Roney Plaza was the big hotel of the ’30s where they had tea dances every Sunday afternoon and all the dignitaries and stars stayed,” recalls Doradean Wilcox, 91, who moved to Miami Beach as an infant in 1923. “Once they built the causeway, they added a street car that went from Miami’s bayside to the beach. It was a beautiful ride. You could feel a marvelous breeze as you got about halfway, and smell the oleanders on either side.”

    From day one, Miami Beach was a boom town, and though the nation suffered from a stock market crash and the Great Depression, Miami Beach was experiencing a hotel building boom by the mid-1930s. Unfortunately, Carl Fisher lost his fortune (and eventually his life, when he died of a gastric hemorrhage in 1939). But the beachside city he loved bounced back.

    Art Deco design took over, and as the Ocean Drive of today began to form, the party returned. “The high school had fraternities and sororities, and each summer from 1938 to 1941, we would rent out a hotel on the beach and have a house party that lasted two weeks,” says Wilcox.

    The National, The Tides South Beach, and the Royal Poinciana Hotel were among the new hospitality hot spots at the time, and places like the Pig Trail Inn—an open-air car hop serving all night—began popping up around town. The Forge, which was an actual forge in the ’20s, where estate owners would bring their horses to get shoes, also morphed into a late-night social scene. “In the late ’30s and early ’40s, it was an illegal casino where they used to gamble upstairs and serve drinks on the patio downstairs,” says Al Malnik, who purchased the 41st Street restaurant in 1968 and turned it into a celebrity haven.

    Clark Gable entering officers’ candidate school in Miami Beach, 1942.
    Clark Gable entering officers’ candidate school in Miami Beach, 1942.

    The fun came to a screeching halt during World War II when roughly half a million troops were sent to Miami Beach for training. The Beach still had celebrities, as Clark Gable was one of the more recognizable servicemen marching around town, but the hotels were turned into soldier housing and training quarters. “You’d see them training at the park and on the beach,” says Kenneth Roth, 74, who as a kid went fishing off the empty lots on Rivo Alto Island where his family built a home. “We had an icebox in our house, and the Royal Palm Ice Company delivered ice to homes in a horse-drawn wagon. The driver would get out at every home, throw a leather blanket and an ice block over his shoulder, walk it into the house, and throw it into the icebox. We did a lot of sweating in those days.”

    What would seem like a disaster for a tourist-driven town, the war actually helped grow Miami Beach as a residential city. A post-war economic boom led many soldiers to return to Miami Beach because “the military got sand in their feet and they saw what a great place this was,” says Roth.

    Miami Beach became the place to be in the late ’40s and ’50s. Department stores such as Saks Fifth Avenue and Bonwit Teller drew shoppers to Lincoln Road, while show hotels like the Sans Souci, Casablanca, the Algiers, and the Saxony, and clubs like Copa City and Ciro’s, bustled with celebrities such as Sammy Davis Jr., Dean Martin, and Frank Sinatra. “Back then, the men wore tuxedos to places like the Casablanca, and women would put on mink stoles to go shopping,” says Florence Linden, 89, who moved to Miami Beach in 1950 and whose late husband, Irv, sang and played saxophone and clarinet for Sammy Kaye’s dance band. “A lot of big acts came down here. My husband played with Sammy Davis Jr. and in the Miami Beach Symphony, which performed in Flamingo Park before moving to the Miami Beach Auditorium. It became a real entertainment town.”

    RELATED: The inside story of Frank Sinatra's Miami stay >>

    Miami Beach, like the rest of America, wasn’t perfect. There was anti-Semitism dating as far back as the Fisher era and segregation up through the ’50s and early ’60s. “There were top entertainers who had to go through the service entrance of hotels, and they weren’t allowed to spend the night,” Linden recalls. “They had to be put up in Liberty City.”

    Gangster Al Capone relaxing in his Palm Island vacation home in 1930.
    Gangster Al Capone relaxing in his Palm Island vacation home in 1930.

    There was also illegal gambling and a mob scene first led by the S&G Syndicate, which would show up at the hotels and take bets long before offtrack betting existed. Then Al Capone and his group of mobsters came in and took over all the illegal activity. “Capone’s gang muscled in and stole it,” says George. “The S&G guys were more finesse than thugs.”

    Miami Beach changed with the times and, for the most part, found itself on the right side of infamy, most notably in 1954 when hotelier Ben Novack opened the Morris Lapidus-designed Fontainebleau hotel. It was the largest hotel in Miami Beach with 554 guest rooms in an 11-story resort that featured a 17,000-square-foot lobby with its signature bow-tie marble floors, Russian and Turkish baths, and 250 cabanas surrounding a gigantic pool. It was fantastic enough to be used as a backdrop in Goldfinger, and to welcome talent like Bob Hope, Lucille Ball, Jackie Gleason, Judy Garland, and so many more. In 1960, Sinatra filmed a television special at the hotel alongside Elvis Presley as the country welcomed the King home from a stint in the military.

    “Everyone in the country was talking about the Fontainebleau and how Miami Beach was now this exotic place just a short plane ride away,” says Toby Udine, who honeymooned at the Fontainebleau in 1964 with her husband, Morey, before eventually moving the family from New Jersey to South Florida permanently. “The pool was amazing, and the weather was fantastic. For a couple of young kids in love, it was the perfect getaway. And 50 years later, we returned to celebrate with our three kids and nine grandchildren, and it brought back all of the memories.”

    That year, 1964, was a big year for Miami Beach: A 22-year-old underdog by the name of Cassius Clay defeated Sonny Liston in the heavyweight boxing championship at the Convention Center; the Beatles landed on the beach, splashing around at the Deauville Hotel before filming a second appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show at the hotel; and Jackie Gleason moved his television show here all that same year.

    RELATED: How Cassius Clay (a.k.a. Muhammad Ali) celebrated his 22nd birthday in the Beach >>

    Through it all, the one constant in Miami Beach has been Joe’s Stone Crab, the world-famous establishment that is currently the second-highest-grossing independent restaurant in America. Joe Weiss started cooking at the bathing casinos in 1913 and opened his doors to Joe’s Seafood Restaurant in 1918, and it’s been a Miami Beach staple through booms and busts. “He wasn’t looking to change the world; he was just trying to make a living,” says Steve Sawitz, Weiss’s great-grandson and current COO of Joe’s Stone Crab. Weiss came to Miami Beach from New York on doctor’s orders to find a warmer climate to help his asthma, and here he created a legend. It’s why in the ’30s, ’40s, and ’50s, under the leadership of the charismatic Jesse Weiss, J. Edgar Hoover, Jack Parr, Walter Winchell, David Brinkley, the Kennedys, and even Al Capone ate at Joe’s and why today everyone from Bill Clinton to Miley Cyrus is cracking crabs. “In a city where the newest, hottest place is always around the corner, there’s a humbleness to Joe’s and the people that work here, but it’s surrounded by the crazy fun,” says Sawitz.

    And that sense of family mixed with the craziness is Miami Beach in a nutshell, or in our case, a crab shell.

    PART II: The More Things Change...

    Miami Beach seen from Indian Creek near 41st Street, 2010.
    Miami Beach seen from Indian Creek near 41st Street, 2010.

    The 1960s were an American golden age, and by 1965, Miami Beach was an overripe landscape of wealth, fame, and power. Frank Sinatra was still king, playing the Fontainebleau’s La Ronde Room every season for free, a tribute to the juice of Fontainebleau regulars like Sam Giancana, Meyer Lansky, and Joe “Stingy” Fischetti. Sinatra even set 1967’s Tony Rome at the Fontainebleau, the same year the Miami Herald launched an investigative series on the hotel’s mob ties. In that era, the mayor of Miami Beach was Elliott Roosevelt, a high-rolling son of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. With screw-it-all frankness, Mayor Roosevelt once noted, “The mob doesn’t run Miami Beach—they just own it.”

    Miami Beach remained a weird quark in the space/time pop continuum. In 1968, when Sinatra was warbling away at the La Ronde, the Beatles were dropping acid and San Francisco was still in its Summer of Love period. Feminists were fighting for women’s rights, but Miami Beach proudly hosted the Miss Universe and Miss USA pageants. At one point, the late pinup photographer Bunny Yeager—who immortalized model Bettie Page on Miami Beach—would send in free pinup photos of herself to be published in the official City of Miami Beach calendar (Yeager was a beauty in her own right).

    America was reeling from the 1965 Watts riots in Los Angeles, and the Beach was a particularly complicated maelstrom of race relations. A predominantly Jewish town faced anti-Semitism, yet also discriminated against African-Americans, just as Miami Beach’s old-guard WASPs did within their own enclaves. Ironically, the rise of Cassius Clay into the civil rights symbol of Muhammad Ali, a pivotal moment in American racial politics, occurred in a city where, until 1963, African-Americans were prohibited from spending the night at hotels, even when they headlined those very same hotels as entertainers. Ali, then Cassius Clay, could be spotted training at the 5th Street Gym.

    Bunny Yeager during her pinup years, posing by a pool in Miami Beach, circa 1950.
    Bunny Yeager during her pinup years, posing by a pool in Miami Beach, circa 1950.

    RELATED: More photos of Bunny Yeager and Bettie Page >>

    What gave Miami Beach a bit of an edge back then was the presence of Richard Nixon, the president angry youth loved to hate. Nixon, who had a house on Key Biscayne, was on hand for the 1972 Republican National Convention on Miami Beach; the Democratic presidential convention of that same year was held on the Beach as well—an alignment that made Miami Beach the center of American political protest. Some 3,000 anti-Vietnam War activists, many in death masks, turned up to protest Nixon’s re-nomination at the Miami Beach Convention Center. The 1972 conventions were also a kind of daily hootenanny for Dade County teenagers—you’d get stoned, protest, be tear-gassed, and dive into a slap of real life.

    Mitchell Kaplan, now a cofounder of the Miami Book Fair International and founder of the Books & Books chain, had just graduated from Miami Beach High School in that year. He was a hometown boy who took the protest beat seriously. “That summer was the last gasp of the American counterculture, happening right in our own backyard,” Kaplan recalls. “Jane Fonda, the Yippies, and everyone else set up in Flamingo Park; I got a subscription to the Black Panther Party newspaper, and years later, asked [party leader] Eldridge Cleaver to sign one of the newspapers. Miami Beach had serious issues, like civil rights and poor, old people, but it was also a kind of fantasy land with a lot of affluence. It was a contradiction, a fading beauty queen that was falling apart. The summer of 1972 was a profound experience for a Miami Beach teenager, but I couldn’t wait to leave and go to college in Colorado.”

    President Richard Nixon (right) and Vice President Spiro T. Agnew talking to supporters at the Miami Beach Convention Center, 1968.
    President Richard Nixon (right) and Vice President Spiro T. Agnew talking to supporters at the Miami Beach Convention Center, 1968.

    The photographer Gary Monroe grew up in Miami Beach and in conjunction with his partner in photography, the late Andy Sweet, set about documenting the Beach of the ’70s. “All these old retirees were slowly vanishing,” Monroe says of that pivotal time in the city’s history. “I shot quite a bit at the old Biscaya Hotel at Fifth Street and West Avenue, which had become a retirement home out of Fellini; now there’s a fancy condo on that site. I also photographed exercise classes on the beach and dances at the old band shell—those years were such a precious legacy.”

    In the mid-1970s, the City of Miami Beach and—surprise—private development interests came up with a ruinous, grandiose, and ultimately failed scheme for the wasteland below Fifth Street. The plan was to create a neo-Venice complete with canals and water taxis; the residents, many of whom were Holocaust survivors with concentration camp numbers tattooed on their arms, successfully fought the effort.

    By 1980, South Beach was Florida’s poorest neighborhood, and the Mariel boatlift that year didn’t help matters; 140,000 mostly law-abiding Cuban refugees streamed into Miami, but many Cubans who had been dumped from Castro’s jails also ended up here, seeking out the cheap rents of South Beach. In 1981, Miami-Dade led the United States in murders. That same year, Time magazine devoted a cover story to Miami and South Beach with the headline “Paradise Lost,” as drug smugglers and dealers flooded the town with cocaine from Colombia’s Medellin cartel.

    South Beach was ultimately saved by Art Deco, dime store masterpieces originally created for tourists in the 1930s. Two Art Deco activists, Barbara Capitman and Leonard Horowitz, went to the National Register of Historic Places and a state preservation board hearing in 1979. Typically, the City of Miami Beach sent representatives to fight against the historic designation, but Capitman prevailed, and the Art Deco District became the first 20th-century historic district to be added to the National Register.

    Christo and Jeanne- Claude’s Surrounded Islands, Biscayne Bay, 1980–83.
    Christo and Jeanne- Claude’s Surrounded Islands, Biscayne Bay, 1980–83.

    In the beginning, Miami Beach symbolized many things—freedom, abandonment, and outlaw creativity—and it all jelled together in 1982, when the renovated Cardozo Hotel opened on Ocean Drive. The cast of regulars included artists Haydee and Sahara Scull (their murals are still up at Puerto Sagua restaurant), the writer John Rothchild, and Christo, who would create Surrounded Islands (11 islands in Biscayne Bay surrounded with pink polypropylene) the following year. Surrounded Islands was internationally acclaimed, the Art Basel of its day, and the 1984 debut of Miami Vice made Miami Beach a mass-market star.

    In 1986, Bruce Weber shot the Obsession campaign for Calvin Klein on the roof of the Breakwater Hotel; Interview magazine put Miami Vice star Don Johnson on the cover and proclaimed the emergent allure of Miami Beach. Barbara Hulanicki, the founder of Biba—the legendary Swinging London boutique with a clientele that included Mick Jagger and Twiggy—came to the Beach and designed Ron Wood’s nightclub, Woody’s. Hulanicki never left; she worked on most of Chris Blackwell’s hotel properties and is still designing hotels and clothes.

    In the ’80s, the development set—from Craig Robins to the late Tony Goldman—tended to be a forward-thinking lot, but Kenny Zirilli, who owned the then-faded Raleigh hotel, was on a whole different level. Actor Rupert Everett lived on Miami Beach for years, and The Raleigh—“a place full of glamour”—figures prominently in his autobiography, Red Carpets and Other Banana Skins. The book is full of evocative vignettes, from Anna The Bee Gees’ Robin Gibb dies; Gibb and his wife lived in Miami Beach for more than two decades. 2012 Nicole Smith parading “naked through the foyer” to the couple Kate Moss and Johnny Depp “looking like identical budgies.”

    RELATED: How Craig Robins transformed today's Miami Design District >>

    The usual progress of gentrification begins with artists drawn to cheap rents: On Miami Beach, the art community of the ’80s and ’90s included Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Roy Lichtenstein, Larry Rivers, Nam June Paik, Antoni Miralda, Mark Handforth, Dara Friedman, Fernando Garcia, Carlos Betancourt, and Carlos Alfonzo. Typically, gay pioneers seem to follow the first influx of artists, and in 1991, one of the world’s most famous gay men, Gianni Versace, discovered Miami Beach.

    Gianni Versace at Casa Casuarina on Ocean Drive in 1996.
    Gianni Versace at Casa Casuarina on Ocean Drive in 1996.

    Versace flew in for the reopening of the Versace boutique in Bal Harbour and set the wheels in motion for his Ocean Drive mansion, Casa Casuarina, an opulent palace that became a haunt for Madonna, Sylvester Stallone, Elton John, and every known emissary of the glossy press. Versace launched the Miami Beach ’90s, which came to be defined by the Delano, Ian Schrager’s collaboration with Philippe Starck, and Madonna. The Material Girl set up camp in a mansion near Vizcaya, just down the block from Stallone. Red-velvet-rope culture was creeping in, but nightlife still intersected with the art world, with Kenny Scharf, Roberto Juarez, José Parlá, Craig Coleman (aka Varla), Howard Davis, and Tomata du Plenty creating nightclub installations.

    At the time, gay dollars were already transforming Miami Beach—also the largest destination for gay men with AIDS. Many of those AIDS sufferers were on steroids and buffed up; Out magazine called Miami Beach a “palm-lined cliff that mighty buffaloes throw themselves over.” The late Pedro Zamora, a Miami kid whose parents came over in the Mariel boatlift, went out to the clubs of that era, and as a cast member on MTV’s Real World, Zamora, an openly gay man with AIDS, changed television culture with his fight for AIDS awareness on the show. His life story became an MTV biopic written by Dustin Lance Black of Milk and was introduced by Bill Clinton.

    Throughout the ’90s, the City of Miami Beach was often at odds with the organic, steadily evolving sophistication of Miami Beach culture. In 1990, Nelson Mandela came to Miami Beach as part of a seven-city United States tour; he was officially snubbed by the City of Miami Beach thanks to his support for Fidel Castro and Yasser Arafat. Civil rights activists called for a national 1,000-day boycott of Miami Beach businesses, and the city lost millions. In the same era, Mayor Alex Daoud was doing unseemly favors for the old guard of Mid-Beach power brokers, people like bankers David Paul and Abel Holtz; in 1993, Daoud was sentenced to 18 months in prison for tax evasion, accepting bribes, and obstructing an investigation.

    The narrative arc of the bohemian-meets-the-beach heyday would come to an end, symbolically, with the tragic murder of Versace in 1997, on the steps of Casa Casuarina. To usher in the new millennium, Donatella Versace threw an end-of-the-line New Year’s Eve party at Casa Casuarina, attended by Jennifer Lopez, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Madonna. As guest Rupert Everett would have it, “la belle époque was officially over.” Madonna and Stallone sold their houses, but the party was just getting started; Versace’s death simply made Miami Beach more famous and even more marketable.

    The man who connected all the dots in the ’80s and ’90s was Louis Canales, who worked with such clubs as Club Nu, Semper’s, and Bar Room. “In the early 1990s, New York magazine called Miami Beach the new St. Barth’s, and that article created so much energy,” says Canales, now creative director of KIWI Arts Group, which presents the work of such photographers as Warhol-stalwart Christopher Makos. “The scene of the early days was over; it was time for hedge fund managers and bottle-service clubs. You can’t hold on to what Miami Beach used to be—it’s like a high school football star at 40, still talking about the big game—but I’m grateful for the memories.”

    In 2002, the launch of Art Basel in Miami Beach proved to be the party that united everyone, from the Mid-Beach crew of government officials and power brokers to artists and fashion designers. It was no doubt a game changer—the world’s biggest and best in the art world descending on our town, and ultimately opening the eyes of visitors who would soon want to become residents.

    RELATED: Fast forward—read our complete recap of Art Basel 2014 >>

    The recent go-go years have had a few hiccups, such as the recession of 2008, but Miami Beach has come roaring back—money has poured in from everywhere. Just like the heyday of the ’50s and ’60s, when colossal properties were built every year to top one another, ever-grander hotels and condominiums are marching north up Collins Avenue, from Ian Schrager’s Edition to Faena to the Surf Club.

    A New World Symphony Wallcast concert at the New World Center.
    A New World Symphony Wallcast concert at the New World Center.

    Artist Michele Oka Doner grew up as a child of privilege in Miami Beach; her father, Kenneth Oka, served as mayor in the ’50s. Oka Doner, who is currently working on the sets and costumes for Miami City Ballet’s 2016 production of George Balanchine’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, has a true grasp of Miami Beach history. With Micky Wolfson, who opened the Wolfsonian museum on Washington Avenue in 1986, she coauthored 2005’s Miami Beach: Blueprint of an Eden. (Wolfson’s father, Mitchell Wolfson Sr., served as mayor of Miami Beach in the ’40s.) “Just 50 years ago, this was a quiet, southern, white-bread kind of town,” says Oka Doner. “It’s a much more international city now, a unique mix that’s producing a creative cauldron.”

    RELATED: Miami Beach mayor Philip Levine prepares for his city’s centennial >>

    On April 13, at Frank Gehry’s New World Center, O, Miami, the Miami-based poetry festival started in 2011, will host a Wallcast poetry reading with two artists of the highest order: former United States poet laureate Kay Ryan and Jamaal May, an emerging poet from Detroit. In honor of Miami Beach’s centennial, O, Miami’s P. Scott Cunningham is also presenting what he laughingly calls a “somewhat intellectual but super fun” nod to Miami Beach history. “At O, Miami, we’re always embracing every aspect of Miami Beach—high and low; the city doesn’t have to take itself so seriously anymore, or repudiate what’s considered ‘low’ culture. Good or bad, Miami Beach is now a completely legitimate city.”


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    What do you do when you have a whole day to yourself? Look no further than the Miami Design District where a French breakfast, an afternoon of luxury, and a Turkish-Greek supper awaits.

    Breakfast

    Buena Vista Deli

    Start your day off on the right foot with a visit to Buena Vista Bakery where the smell of freshly baked chocolate almond croissants will greet you. If that doesn’t wake you up, a cup of java from nearby local roaster Panther Coffee might. 4590 NE 2nd Ave. Miami, 305-576-3945

    Retail Therapy

    Miami Design District

    If there’s anywhere to shop 'til you drop it’s the Design District. Feel like a kid in an opulent candy store as you peruse the city blocks oozing pure luxury. Think Louis Vuitton, Hermès, Bulgari, and even Jonathan Adler. Whether it’s a timeless Cartier you’re looking for, red soles from Christian Louboutin, or even just window shopping, you’ll find it all here.

    RELATED: How Craig Robins transformed the Miami Design District >>

    Lunch

    Michael's Genuine

    Shopping counts as cardio, right? After being on your feet all morning, head over to James Beard winner Michael Schwartz’s namesake restaurant. While you simply can’t go wrong at Michael’s Genuine Food & Drink, do it right with the deviled eggs, chicken liver crostini, and house-made pastrami sandwich. Don’t forget to finish it off with one of Hedy Goldsmith’s infamous treats, like strawberry shortcake in a jar. 130 NE 40th St. Miami, 305-573-5550

    Art Stop

    Adamar Fine Arts Gallery

    Forget venturing over to Miami’s Arts District to scope out street art—the Design District’s got a few of its own murals to take in and photograph like Jungle and Vortex by 2X4. Once you’ve analyzed those works, move on to enjoy a bit of Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein at contemporary art gallery Adamar Fine Arts. 4141 NE Second Ave. 305-576-1335

    Cocktails

    The Cypress Room

    A lingering afternoon is complete only with a proper Old Fashioned. Get it at Michael Schwartz’s ode to fine dining, The Cypress Room. There are only eight seats at the bar, so be sure to snag one quickly, and skip ahead to the cocktails chapter of the book of a menu. 3620 NE Second Ave. Miami, 305-520-5197

    Dinner

    Mandolin

    There’s something about Mandolin that’s simply irresistible—perhaps it’s the white and blue façade that transports you to the heart of the Greek islands, or the picturesque courtyard enveloped by oak trees and lit by lanterns. It could also be that the Turkish-Greek fare is undeniably fresh (the herbs are plucked from the on-site garden) and delicious. 4312 NE Second Ave. Miami, 305-576-6066

    Live Music

    the stage miami

    Get cozy on one of the couches at live music venue/bar The Stage, which has the look and feel of a coffee shop and the energy of a comedy club. Views of the stage are available from every seat in the house, so you’ll be able to not just hear what's happening, but also see local and national acts, which range from jazz and hip-hop to reggae and alternative. 170 NE 38th St., Miami, 305-576-9577

    Edible Nightcap

    La Latina

    Did all that dancing and drinking make you hungry again? Stop by La Latina on your way home for an arepa, a Venezuelan stuffed corn cake, unlike any other; these authentic pockets of heaven are gluten-free and filled with hormone-free meat, so you’ll feel better about noshing in the late hours of the night. Be sure to try the reina pepiada—house-made chicken salad with avocado—and don’t be afraid to sauce it up. 3509 NE Second Ave. Miami, 305-571-9655

    RELATED: Which Miami stylist loves La Latina?

    PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF FACEBOOK.COM/MIAMIDESIGNDISTRICT (LOUIS VUITTON);  MANDOLIN.COM; MIAMIDESIGNDISTRICT.COM (ADAMAR FINE ART); FACEBOOK.COM/THESTAGEMIAMI


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    Film producer, screenwriter, and author Nadine Schiff-Rosen honors the memory of her late friend, legendary Star Trek actor Leonard Nimoy, the best way she knows how: through his love of sweets.

    Susan Bay, Leonard Nimoy, and Sia.

    The late Leonard Nimoy (CENTER) with wife Susan Bay (LEFT) and singer Sia (RIGHT) at an event in LA this past fall. 

    With so many laudatory words written about Leonard Nimoy this week, I am proud to report I have an exclusive: Just In: Leonard Nimoy loved sweets. I know this, because sitting at our kitchen banquette, I would watch him dive in, clutching a spoon, spearing a dish of chocolate ice cream topped off by thick, hot fudge sauce. Closing his eyes in ecstasy, the rapture drizzling down his throat, he would look heavenward—eyes closed, as if in prayer.

    His eclectic love of confections knew no bounds: Vanilla macaroons, cream-filled éclairs, peanut butter brittle, custards, meringues, puddings, soufflés—I was lucky to watch him devour desserts around the world. Just as a botanist would feel at one with a rare orchid, so too would Leonard commune with a red velvet cupcake, exploring the icing, excavating the creamy center. Then, sliding the plate over to me, he would cry out, “OH, YEAH,” in a way that made me wonder if he and his sugary delight shouldn’t get a room. And if he was met with resistance from me—a self-deprecating remark about watching my weight, for example—he would nudge the plate over to me further, his long, tapered fingers wordlessly ordering me to, “Take a bite.”

    And so, take a bite we did. Friends and neighbors with he and his wife Susan Bay Nimoy, we traveled with them to the sunny islands of Greece to celebrate my husband’s 65th birthday. Leonard loved the sun on his face, his ear buds shutting out the world, inhaling the musical poetry of Leonard Cohen. Later that night, he read to us three short stories by Woody Allen, his hypnotic voice giving Woody’s words a cadence and gravitas I’m not sure actually existed on the page, but came alive with Leonard’s interpretation.

    Relaxing in the shade with a lemonade and gelato, young travelers from all over the world would approach him in the town square, shyly requesting a picture he knew would promptly be posted on their Facebook page or Twitter feed. Still, Leonard would always oblige gratefully—the humility of his fame and fortune the opposite of narcissistic drama.

    Two years ago, we sailed the Alaskan coast where we sat out on the deck, the glaciers falling into the Bay. Even though at that point, each and every breath was precious, he sang songs to me in Yiddish that always made me cry. Even though I did not know the language, he returned to me some part of my soul that in some other lifetime must have spoken Yiddish fluently. Together, we time-traveled through our shared roots in the Ukraine, into the alternate reality of the fourth dimension—even though my body remained rooted in the deck chair beside him.

    And here’s something else: Leonard love to laugh—and he did laugh, often and loudly. And he loved it when you laughed back.

    He loved his wife, Susan, and his children, Adam, Julie, and Aaron—and all of their children—worried over them like beads rolling in his hands, searching for answers to their life questions, the humanoid Vulcan Poppie, wanting to dispense every grain of wisdom before his time on this planet was over.

    Leonard loved the majesty of books. And movies. And art. Photography. Especially photography.

    He loved the duality of light and dark. Men and women. Fat and thin.

    He loved the vulnerable humanity of exposing secrets. His own and others.

    He loved political discussions. Politics, not so much.

    Leonard Nimoy as Dr. Spock.

    Leonard Nimoy as Dr. Spock on Star Trek.

    He celebrated his roots. Without prompting, he would regale us with memories of growing up on the west side of Boston, newsboy poor. Then, that call West: making that long trek to Pasadena at the tender age of 18 to begin acting classes, his mother, Dora, insistent that he wear his new and only brown wool suit on the train to what must have felt a continent away.

    Think about that boy—that boy who lived in a tiny room, alone, working odd jobs to eat, how could he have even imagined the success, the iconic status that he would eventually come to embrace? How could he have ever suspected that the hand blessing he learned as an eight-year-old, hiding behind his father’s tallis in an Orthodox synagogue would bring to the world an internationally understood gesture of world peace and civility? That his Judaic roots would mushroom into a philosophical system, replete with its own campaign slogan and acronym—LLAP? Live Long and Prosper.

    At his memorial lunch in Los Angeles, given with love by his wife, my husband and I offered to host the sweets table. “Wall to wall,” I said. “Just fill every surface with chocolate-lemon puff pastries, and crème de brulee brownies,” figuring the overflow might seduce Leonard back from wherever he had gone.

    But even with his plate full and piled high, Leonard was only content when he shared his treasures with the people he loved. Only then, could he bite into a passion project: a photographic series, a movie script, a piece of music, a philanthropic cause, or even a Kit Kat candy bar, and roar, “OH YEAH,” then push his plate into the middle.

    Like Mr. Spock, he understood the psychology of mere mortals like us who inhabit this planet. That after all these years of pushing his plate in our direction to share his riches, he was not just offering—he was challenging us to take one bite. Our bite. And because Leonard Nimoy was a visionary, whose soul swept across the Universe, and who understood time was so short that he ate dessert for dinner, we did. 

    PHOTOGRAPHY BY NBC TELEVISION/GETTY IMAGES (STAR TREK); STEFANIE KEENAN/GETTY IMAGES FOR HAMMER MUSEUM (SIA, BAY, NIMOY)

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  • 03/03/15--21:00: 5 DJs to Watch in 2015
  • With the ever-changing sound of the electronic music scene, Ocean Drive asked Adam Russakoff, the executive producer/director of business affairs and talent buyer of Ultra Music festival, to give us his top five acts to watch out for in 2015.

    Ultra Music Festival.In 2013, Ultra Music Festival sold out both of its weekends, with more than 330,000 people in attendance.

    “Musically they’re in the right space at the right time,” says Adam Russakoff. “They all share that cool, happy, vibey, chill music. Big, loud noise is more or less being taken over with this vibey stuff with the live component. Everything has its time. When something new comes, people tend to gravitate towards it.”

    Caribou
    Canadian-born composer and music producer Caribou (Dan Victor Snaith) recently released “The Longest Mixtape,” a collection of 1,000 songs important to him.

    Kygo
    The 23-year-old DJ out of Norway has sold out US tours from NYC to LA, remixed for everyone from Coldplay to Diplo, and according to Billboard, is “primed to become the next EDM superstar.”

    Odesza
    This duo consisting of Harrison Mills (aka CatacombKid) and Clayton Knight (aka BeachesBeaches) is based out of Seattle and to date has earned 16 Hype Machine number ones. Their album In Return debuted at number one on both the Billboard Electronic chart and the iTunes Electronic chart.

    Oliver Heldens
    His “Gecko/Overdrive” has already been viewed 15 million times on YouTube, while 2015 will bring tracks with industry leaders Tiësto, Zeds Dead, and Sander van Doorn.

    Tchami
    Born Martin Bresso, Tchami, a DJ/producer from Paris, has performed with Skrillex, Diplo, and more, with a style described as “future house.”


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    From tasting South Florida's best restaurant fare to sampling unlimited servings of wine and beer, this four-day event (April 15-18) is a can't-miss culinary fest. Here are 10 reasons why you should get your tickets to VeritageMiami right now.

    VeritageMiami.

    1. Food is NOT sold separately.

    At VeritageMiami’s Craft Beer and Fine Wine Tastings, all the drinks and food are included with your ticket purchase; and we aren’t talking bite-sized olives either. Dozens of the hottest South Florida restaurants will serve full-portions of unlimited deliciousness. Take for example, the Daily Melt’s truffle, bacon, tomato, cheddar, and provolone melt that was served at last year’s Craft Beer Tasting or the steak skewers with chimichurri sauce and ropa vieja empanadas that Wynwood Kitchen & Bar dished out. Yum.

    2. Look Ma, no hands.

    Kudos to those of you who can enjoy an event with multiple drinks in hand. For the rest (er, majority) of us who can’t juggle two or three drinks, plus a plate of food without making a splash or ruining our outfits, we’ve got just the thing for you. Each guest at VeritageMiami’s Fine Wine Tasting will receive a plate that doubles as wine glass holders, giving you one-handed freedom for all the selfies you'll be taking as you feast on the finest local grub and wines from around the country.

    3. A WHOLE burger.

    Yes, we are serious when we say Shake Shack, a longtime VeritageMiami Craft Beer Tasting participant, will serve its classic ShackBurger in its entirety! The burgers will be cooked onsite, fresh off the flaming 72’ flat-top griddle, and straight into your hands.

    4. The cabs are here!

    At VeritageMiami’s Craft Beer Tasting, everyone can enjoy the unlimited servings of brews—even the designated driver! We’ve partnered with Uber to offer free transportation (up to $20) with purchase of a ticket.

    5. After the party, it’s the “after party".

    Living in the 305, we know it’s all about the after parties, which is why the United Way Young Leaders throw one heck of a nightcap at the annual Craft Beer Tasting after party. See you at MAPS Backlot in Wynwood featuring select beer, dessert, and liquor sponsors.

    6. Go fish!

    If you’re a true Miamian, we know you’ve enjoyed a baseball game or two at the new Marlins Park, but never from the point of view you’ll experience at VeritageMiami’s Auction & Wine Dinner on the Diamond. Feel what it’s like to play in the big leagues when you step foot on the MLB field to enjoy your four-course meal under the stars, thanks to the hi-tech LEED Gold Certified retractable roof.

    7. Wine, wine, more wine… did we mention, WINE?

    VeritageMiami is open to all importers and distributors, so you’ll have an enormous range of wines to taste, from small boutique producers to large multi-nationals. At the Fine Wine Tasting alone, guests will have the opportunity to sample nearly 400 wines, which are all served by winos who know their stuff! Wineries know that VeritageMiami tasters want to find new and interesting options, so they send pourers who speak about the wines with passion and knowledge. Find a wine you like, and get the whole story on it right then and there—think of the pourers as your personal Winepedia!

    8. You get in on the cooking action!

    At VeritageMiami’s Interactive Dinner, guests can let their inner foodie come alive. Five celebrity chefs guide guests, as they prepare their own five-course meals right at their tables. Not to worry, aprons and toques are available for full-on foodie satisfaction and chef transformations. And when all the wine from reason number 7 starts to set in, guests can count on the help of culinarily talented Johnson & Wales students, who will be your personal sous chefs.

    9. We'll take it with a side of concert, please.

    At VeritageMiami’s Auction & Wine Dinner on the Diamond guests will not only experience great food, wine and an amazing venue (see reason number 6), but we're also throwing in a concert! We’re not telling who the evening’s entertainment is just yet, but we guarantee the performance will knock it out of the park!

    10. You can make a difference!

    Last, but certainly not least, you’ll be eating, drinking, partying, and cooking all to the benefit of United Way of Miami-Dade and its work to strengthen our community. Not only will you walk away full and tipsy, but you’ll feel proud and fulfilled.

    See you at VeritageMiami! Tickets can be purchased online here.


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    Before anyone else was selling a dream with an ocean view, there was Ocean Beach Realty Company, Miami’s first full-service realtors.

    The Ocean Beach Realty CompanyThe Ocean Beach Realty Company opened in Miami Beach in 1912, paving the way for the development of what is now South Beach.

    A snapshot of today’s booming Miami skyline—and the cranes building it—is indicative of the city’s layered history encompassing over a century of real estate development. More than 100 years ago, one real estate firm, the Ocean Beach Realty Company, started it all and helped create the city we know today as Miami Beach.

    In 1911, a group of visionaries had converged around the idea that Miami Beach could be the country’s next greatest tourism destination. Land developer, businessman, and agriculturalist John S. Collins had begun developing various orchards along the Miami Beach peninsula; his son-in-law, T.J. Pancoast, relocated from New Jersey to support the developments.

    “Mr. Collins’s idea was to pattern it after Atlantic City, NJ, as Atlantic City at that time was the summer playground of the United States, and to make this the winter playground,” said Arthur Pancoast, Collins’s grandson, in the book The Magic of Miami Beach. “From that point on, of course, his showmanship and salesmanship took over, and the city has gradually evolved until it really is fabulous.”

    Collins quickly realized the potential for Miami Beach, and with Pancoast, and funds from two local banks headed by brothers J.N. and J.E. Lummus, began construction on the Collins Toll Bridge to connect downtown Miami to the Beach. Then, with half of the bridge completed—and out of funds—the Lummus brothers left their positions in finance for a more lucrative venture in real estate and created the Ocean Beach Realty Company, pictured here in 1912. They snapped up 605 acres of swamp land from what is today’s South of Fifth neighborhood to Lincoln Road, paying anywhere from $150 to $12,500 per acre, starting what would one day be known as South Beach.

    A year later, in 1913, Collins was able to complete his toll bridge, allowing residents to come to and from Miami Beach, thus launching a flurry of real estate action. Today, a multitude of real estate developers plan, build, and sell some of the world’s most sought-after projects in this oceanfront community, upholding the vision Collins, the Lummus brothers, and Ocean Beach Realty Company had for Miami Beach.

    PHOTOGRAPHY BY STATE ARCHIVES OF FLORIDA, FLORIDA MEMORY


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    From bar birthdays to BBQ (and both at the same time), we round up four can't-miss events in this week's food and drink news. 

    Bucks at the Raleigh

    Beer Garden Pop-Up at The Raleigh

    Great news, beer drinkers: The Raleigh's backyard (a.k.a. the Oasis) will turn into Buck's Beer Garden & Bonfire every first and third Thursday of the month. Picture fire pits, picnic tables, and classic German fare by Restaurant Michael Schwartz. Don't miss the next pop-up featuring Wynwood Brewing Company on March 19. 1775 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-534-6300

    Extended Happy Hour at The Local

    Tired of waiting till 5? The Local Craft Food & Drink feels your pain; it just launched a 7-hour weekday happy hour that starts at noon. Sneak away from your desk for house-made lunch specials and exclusive prices on brews, wine, and spirits, or swing by from 3-4:30 p.m. for "linner" specials on charcuterie, cheese boards, and cornmeal hushpuppies. And for the workaholics, The Local does happy hour on the weekends from 4-7 p.m. 150 Giralda Ave., Coral Gables, 305-648-5687

    Birthday Drinks at MO Bar + Lounge

    Stop in to say happy first birthday to Mandarin Oriental's MO Bar + Lounge and enjoy exclusive craft cocktails just for the occasion. Now through March 13, patrons can toast with celebratory libations like the MO 75 with Limoncello, grapefruit, and prosecco, or the POM Collins, a blend of gin, pomegranate, lemon, and soda. If you happen to be fêting a birthday this week as well, you'll get your very own treat: a complimentary punch cocktail. 500 Brickell Key Drive, Miami, 305-913-8358

    BBQ Benefit at Uvaggio

    There's another bar birthday down in Coral Gables; Uvaggio Wine Bar turns 1 on Sunday, March 22 and celebrating with a wine-fueled BBQ bash from 3-7 p.m. Come for wine and beer, live blues music, and signature dishes whipped up by Top Chef contestant Bret Pelaggi. Even better: The proceeds will benefit the Buckham family, whose daughter is battling cancer. 70 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables, 305-448-2400; Purchase tickets here


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    While visiting Miami, Mae Whitman, star of the latest coming-of-age flick The Duff, chatted with us about her rough high school years and how she handles haters in Hollywood.

    Actress Mae Whitman.Mae Whitman.

    Mae Whitman is that rare show-biz breed who has grown up in front of the camera lens and managed to come out unscathed. She first won us over with her roles on Arrested Development and Parenthood; now, as the lead in the well-received The Duff, Whitman is poised to be Hollywood’s next leading lady—and one who is putting her platform to positive use. We joined Whitman at the Mondrian South Beach, where she spent her first time in Miami with thousands of women and girls celebrating Aerie’s new swim collection and the #AerieReal campaign and snapping the world’s largest unretouched selfie. Here, she opens up about The Duff, real-life mean girls, and the pressures of image in Hollywood.

    What’s unique about The Duff is that it has such a positive message. Was that important to you when working on the project?
    MAE WHITMAN:
    [It was] everything. I was like, we can make this funny and fun, but the main thing we have to work really hard on is getting the heart in there and getting the message to be clear and honest and real. The tricky thing was making sure that people understood that this is just really a method of communication.

    Mae Whitman with her mom.Whitman poses for a selfie with her mom.

    Did high-school-aged Mae relate to your character in the film?
    MW:
    I got made fun of a lot and I was bullied for the ways that I looked different from other girls. I think it happens a lot. So I really wanted to communicate to girls, I know this is really hard and I know it hurts, but you have the power to change your perspective and realize that if people are trying to tear you down, that probably means that you have something really special that they’re threatened by. Try and throw love at that because that must be a sad way to live. This has been my lifelong struggle and [I] understand. If it makes one girl feel a little less alone and better about herself, then that’s a job well done.

    RELATED: How Lost star Evangeline Lilly came to terms with Hollywood fame >>

    Have you experienced a similar kind of bullying in your career?
    MW:
    I’ve been doing this for 23 years and I still get my feelings hurt all the time. I just lost out on a movie that really should have been mine because they basically were like, “Well, we don’t think you’re pretty enough.” Straight up.

    World's Largest Selfie.Posing for the world's largest selfie.

    Despite these hardships, you’ve really come into your own at 26.
    MW:
    Every day is a struggle. Some days I’m still like, “I don’t like the way I [look]…” and other days you feel really good about it. I’m so lucky that I’ve had the experiences that I’ve had. I think the more that I got challenged, the more it made me really grow and realize who I wanted to be and what I didn’t need and actually stand more comfortably in myself. You can use that to fuel your fire of feeling amazing about yourself and presenting your best self into the world. I want to continue to be a voice and a connection to girls who feel they might be out of place or want a friend in a far-off realm.

    Why is the AerieReal campaign significant?
    MW:
    For me, it makes perfect sense. It’s so perfectly in connection, first of all, with the movie that I just did. And second of all, I have always found the things that attract me the most to people are things that make them different. That’s what makes the world go round. Why would you ever want to look like anybody else? The more you can be comfortable in yourself, love exactly what you have and present it with all the love in your heart, then that’s what makes people feel really drawn to you and makes you move through the world in a way that feels natural and good. I think the fact that [Aerie is] not retouching their photos is brave. A lot of corporations don’t do that stuff. It’s important and amazing.

    The World's Largest Selfie.The world's largest unretouched selfie with Mae Whitman, Hannah Bronfman, and Julie Sarinana.

    Any advice to young women dealing with criticism or bullying?
    MW:
    Do not take it personally. If somebody doesn’t see you for who you are, you don’t want to be around them anyway. You don’t want to be giving your special light to somebody that is not fully in love with everything that you are. You cannot take it personally. Those are weird people behind desks sometimes. You just can’t take it personally, because that stuff just isn’t real.

    PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF SETH BROWARNIK/WORLD RED EYE


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    To pay homage to its enduring legacy of luxury timepieces and immaculate design, Vacheron Constantin introduces Harmony, a new collection of watches to add to their lengthy repertoire.

    Harmony Calibre

    Vacheron Constantin Caliber 3300

    In honor of 260 years of continuous production—the longest of any manufacturer—Vacheron Constantin has unveiled a new line of timepieces under the banner name Harmony. The line will feature a cushion-shaped case and a design that is inspired by a yellow gold chronograph produced in 1928. However, the modern realization takes advantage of its case construction, curves, and lines to help reflect light—revealing multiple facets of the watch. Additionally, Vacheron Constantin has developed all new calibers for these watches, attesting to its dedication to perfection and excellence, which has fueled the brand for 260 years.

    Here, we present a quick overview of the initial line, which consists of both small and medium complications as well as a grande complication.

    Harmony Dual Time

    Harmony Dual Time

    Harmony Dual Time watches.

    Available in both pink and white gold, the Dual Time displays the second time zone at the four/five o’clock position and a day/night indicator at the seven. Using the Caliber 2460DT, this self-winding watch is comprised of 233 parts and features a decorated oscillating weight. This line will be limited to 625 pieces. Additionally, the Harmony Dual Time also comes in a smaller, diamond studded version that features the same movements as the larger model. Exactly 500 pieces of the smaller diamond version will be available.

    Harmony Chronograph

    Harmony Chronograph

    Harmony Chronograph with pulismeter.

    The 252-part, hand-wound Caliber 3300 drives the modern-day interpretation of the 1928 chronograph that inspired the line. The monopusher chronograph sports a pulsometric scale and comes in an 18-karat 5N pink gold case. The dual register dial features a 45-minute timer at three o’clock and a 60-second timer at nine o’clock. Similar to the Dual Time, the Chronograph will feature a smaller diamond studded version. However unlike the Dual Time, the smaller chronograph houses a different movement than its larger counterpart. The small model is powered by the Caliber 1142; the Harmony Chronograph Small features a dual register chronograph with a similar dial layout to its larger-sized sibling. Both sizes will be limited to 260 pieces each.

    Harmony Tourbillon Chronograph

    Tourbillon Chronograph

    Harmony Tourbillon Chronograph

    The Tourbillon Chronograph is a monopusher chronograph powered by the hand-wound Caliber 3200 and is housed in a platinum case. The dial layout displays a single register chronograph where the timer can be found at the three o’clock position. The Tourbillon escapement at the 12 o’clock offers stunning appeal. The chronograph timer is a 45-minute timer, which, when added to the monopusher function, makes for a rare-breed combination. The Tourbillon sports a robust 65 hours of power reserve, and will be highly limited in availability, with only 26 being created.

    Harmony Ultra-Thin Grande Complication Chronograph

    Complication Chronograph

    Harmony Ultra Thin Grande Complications Chronograph

    Out of the entire collection, the Ultra-Thin Grande Complication Chronograph will receive the most attention due to both the technical complexity of the piece, as well as the effort Vacheron Constantin has put into creating one of the thinnest self-winding split seconds chronograph movements on the market. Measuring 5.20 mm thick, the self-winding Caliber 3500 makes good on the claim. Cased, the watch measures a total thickness of 8.4 mm.

    Ultra Thin

    The superlative ultra-thin piece offers a 60-minute chronograph, a split second function for the chronograph, and a power reserve indicator. Some watch buffs may have an issue with the use of the word "grande" given the functions the watch offers; however, the combination of ultra-thin caliber and the monopusher split seconds chronograph is a vast achievement. It should be noted that, in typical Vacheron Constantin style, this venerable brand has meticulously hand-finished each of the 459 pieces that comprise the watch.

     

    Founder and editor-in-chief of ATimelyPerspective.com, Roberta Naas is a veteran award-winning journalist in the watch industry with more than 25 years of experience. She was the first woman watch editor in the US market—breaking in to an “all boys network” with a pioneering spirit that would be her signature to this day. Naas brings responsible, factual—yet always timely and insightful—reporting of the watch industry to the forefront.


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    The first watch exhibition of 2015 indicates that even the simplest timepieces are rising to complex new heights.

    Luxury Watches
    Greubel Forsey’s QP à Équation watch (price on request) combines the tourbillon with the perpetual calendar and an equation of time mechanism. Les Bijoux, 306 Plaza Real, Boca Raton, 561-361-2311

    The sale of timepieces in 2014 is estimated to have been nearly $40 billion globally, with watches from Switzerland accounting for more than half of that sum. That may well be why the world’s first watch exhibition of 2015, the Salon International de la Haute Horlogerie (SIHH) in January, was the place to be.

    More than 12,000 watch retailers and specialty press descended on Geneva for the SIHH show to witness 16 top luxury brands unveil their newest creations. These watches, many that were years in the making, will arrive in the US market beginning this summer and will set the trends for the year to come and beyond. Making a strong appearance on the scene were skeletonized watches, astronomically inspired pieces, and high complications such as tourbillons— watches that have an added escapement to compensate for the errors in timing due to the effects of gravity when the wrist is in certain positions.

    Also making important statements at the more affordable price range are creative new chronographs and both annual calendars (which need a date adjustment once a year at the end of February) and perpetual calendars (which are generally perfect timekeepers until the year 2100, when we skip a scheduled leap year).

    Garnering particular attention this year is the category of skeletonized watches, which are created by carving away much of the metal from the movement so the wearer can view the beauty of the elaborate gears and wheels. A watchmaker can spend countless hours whittling away as much as 70 percent of the metal, but must do so in a way that preserves the strength of the piece. Additionally, these tiny components are usually engraved, resulting in a breathtaking work of art and precision. Brands such as Cartier, Roger Dubuis, and Parmigiani Fleurier take the lead this year with elaborate new pieces. In fact, Cartier has unveiled the Crash Skeleton, a watch whose movement had to be reconfigured to fit inside the unusually shaped Dali-inspired case.

    RELATED: A first look at Vacheron Constantin's 260th anniversary collection >>

    Luxury Watches
    LEFT TO RIGHT:
    1. To build the Cartier Crash Skeleton ($62,000), the entire movement had to be reconfigured and then meticulously carved away to be visible. Miami Design District, 151 NE 40th St., 305-864-8793 
    2. Piaget again set world records with its Altiplano Chronograph ($29,000) as the thinnest hand-wound chronograph movement and watch. Miami Design District, 140 NE 39th St., 305-908-4050 
    3. Jaeger-LeCoultre’s Duomètre Sphérotourbillon Moon watch (price on request) is all about astronomy. It combines moon-phase indication with a double-carriage tourbillon escapement. Aventura Mall, 19575 Biscayne Blvd., 305-521-0600


    In the realm of tourbillons, some brands are combining the complex tourbillon escapement with other useful functions such as chronographs and perpetual calendars. Montblanc, for instance, debuted the Heritage ExoTourbillon in a special tribute Vasco da Gama edition. Named for the famed explorer who navigated by the Southern Cross in the 1500s to connect Europe with Asia, the stunning version features an aventurine dial complete with the stars of the Southern Cross in the design. This watch incorporates yet another key trend seen this year: astronomically inspired watches.

    The heavens and astronomy movement is one that Jaeger-LeCoultre blends in its new Duomètre Sphérotourbillon Moon watch, which combines moon-phase indication and a seemingly free-floating tourbillon escapement. Similarly, Greubel Forsey focuses on astronomy with its seventh invention watch: QP à Équation, which masterfully combines tourbillon, perpetual calendar, and equation of time mechanisms (which offers the difference between real time and solar time), complete with season display. These luxury watches are true statement makers in 2015.

    In the world of chronograph advancements, Piaget’s new Altiplano Chronograph sets two world records in the ultrathin field: The hand-wound flyback movement (caliber 883P) measures 4.65mm, and the finished watch measures just 8.24mm thick.

    Other great new chronographs hail from brands such as Panerai, Ralph Lauren, and IWC. In fact, IWC has greatly expanded on its Portugieser collection of watches in honor of its 75th anniversary this year. In celebration, the brand showcases several new chronographs and calendar watches and introduces new in-house-made movements, including one for the Portugieser annual calendar.

    Start your wish list; this is a year filled with great timepieces.


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    The MDC Museum of Art + Design showcases a colorful turn for Odalis Valdivieso.

    Untitled #15
    Untitled #15
    , 2014, by Odalis Valdivieso.

    Call it a happy accident. Before spending a month in Berlin last year, Miami artist Odalis Valdivieso’s work was known for its exploration of hard-edged geometric abstraction. That general approach still powers her latest paintings—part of her new solo exhibition, “Arrhythmic Suite,” at the Miami Dade College Museum of Art + Design—but the sharp lines have been softened and suffused within warm multicolored hues.

    The catalyst for this shift had little to do with an immersion into avant garde German culture, however. The original plan was to spend some time with the Berlin-based writer who is contributing an essay to a new artist’s book Valdivieso is producing, and then hunker down in solitude to focus on her painting.

    Once overseas, though, Valdivieso stumbled upon a particular consistency of calligraphic inks used primarily for folkloric writing and hand-inscribed religious texts.

    After some experimentation, she discovered the inks also offered a unique way to paint, moving Valdivieso to pile different colored blocks alongside and atop one another, fashioning a beguiling haze. “The ink creates soft and translucent layers that I find more fascinating than if I had used watercolors,” she says. “Watercolors give you a flat ending, whereas the ink is silky with a rainbow-like reflection when it dries.”

    For an artist who has previously been as focused on art theory as on her art itself, the ink’s rapid drying time forced her to act in the moment and lose herself in the motions of painting: “It allows you to just react in an emotional way.” Odalis Valdivieso’s “Arrhythmic Suite” is on display through April 26 at the Miami Dade County Museum of Art + Design, 600 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, 305-237-7700


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    Miami-based menswear designer Ike Behar opens a new Merrick Park outpost of his eponymous brand—all while keeping it in the family.

    Ike Behar Village of Merrick Park
    Joshua and Ike Behar at the Ike Behar boutique in Village of Merrick Park.

    Stories about immigrants chasing the American Dream, coming to the United States and making an empire out of a few dollars and the sheer will to succeed, abound in the fashion industry. Menswear designer Ike Behar is one such story. Behar’s eponymous brand was launched in New York City in 1952, when Behar had just $50 in his pocket. Since then, it’s grown to include countless wholesale accounts and several freestanding concept stores, such as the recently opened boutique in Merrick Park.

    “Craftsmanship is paramount in everything we do at Ike Behar,” says Joshua Behar, a third-generation member of the business. “My grandfather began this business as an apprentice to his father, who was a master tailor in Cuba. The qualities of one-of-a-kind and custom-made pieces were ingrained into Ike from his earliest experiences, and as such, our product offerings always aspire to the look of custom-made.”

    Ike enlisted in the Korean War, during which time he met his wife and the company’s cofounder, Regina. At first, Ike enjoyed success as a New York City tailor shop owner. Another enterprising businessman named Ralph Lauren was so impressed with his skills that he approached Ike in the 1970s to help him expand his tie business to shirting.

    Ike Behar
    Ike Behar (with son Steven) taking measurements.

    Twenty years ago, Ike moved operations—and his family—to South Florida, where he continues to run his empire. “Our finest custom shirts are still made here in Miami,” says Joshua of the line, which is regularly seen on Hollywood’s biggest stars, including Brad Pitt, Jamie Foxx, and Bradley Cooper, and has been a wardrobe staple for movies like Donnie Brasco and Miami Vice, and on television shows such as Entourage and Magic City. “Our elegant, hand-woven ties are produced in California, and our made-to-measure suits are produced in Chicago. We keep production of the most luxurious pieces we make here in America because we have a strong belief in the American worker. In our factories, we employ some of the best, most experienced craftsmen and seamstresses in the world, and in their ingenuity and hard work they epitomize the strength and quality of the American workforce.”

    For spring, Ike Behar will debut a palette inspired by the natural dyes and colors of luxurious fabrics such as cashmere, alpaca, silk, and linen, with whimsy and color injected in the form of peacock blue, soft rose quartz, melon, and tangerine. “Our inspiration continues to be drawn from our customer, who has the confidence to experiment with color,” affirms Joshua. This collection will be available in the new Merrick Park location, the fifth stand-alone store for the brand in the US, which will also carry Ike Behar’s entire line of shirting, ties, suits, sports coats, sports shirts, and accessories, along with a made-to-measure program. Adds Alan Behar, Ike’s son and the current company co-owner and CEO, “It’s tremendous that we are now able to provide customers with a more comprehensive experience with our brand and our products [at Merrick Park].”

    Clothing Ike Behar
    A selection of shirts.

    There is, of course, a special place in the Behar family’s heart for its Miami home base. “Miami is a natural home for us,” says Joshua. “Our factory here employs some of the best tailors around, many of whom have worked for us for over 20 years.”

    Adds the company patriarch, “Keeping the business in the family and in Miami allows us to carry on in the spirit in which we were founded. We find it important to personally ensure that every product that bears the Ike Behar name adheres to our strict standards. As a family, we try to each remain involved in most aspects of operating the business. We each have our own expertise within the three generations around the office [sons Alan with finance and operations, Steven with design and merchandising, and Lawrence with production and customer relations; grandson Joshua with media and marketing; and granddaughter Alexandra with public relations]. We take care to consult with one another, always seeking support and diversity of opinion.”

    As to what keeps the family itself inspired? Says Alan, “Ike is a first-generation Cuban immigrant as well, so like many Miamians, we relish the international and cosmopolitan atmosphere of the city. In a world where fashion trends are often defined by New York and Milan, having a Miami and family perspective has served us very well.” Village of Merrick Park, 358 San Lorenzo Ave., Coral Gables, 305-448-5028


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    With a variety of new projects, KNR Hospitality Group’s Nicola Siervo and Arim Masri look back at the South Beach that was, and predict the Miami that will be.

    Karim Masri and Nicola Siervo at the 1930s House, which Siervo describes as the “alternative to a club.”
    Karim Masri and Nicola Siervo at the 1930s House, which Siervo describes as the “alternative to a club.”

    Karim Masri and Nicola Siervo were part of the nightlife and restaurant revolution that changed South Beach from sketchy beach town in the 1980s to underground hot spot in the ’90s to the over-the-top global destination we know today. They’ve been partners in the KNR Hospitality Group since 2005 and run venues like Quattro, The Dutch, and Wall, and helped create the tone at the Thompson Miami Beach’s Seagrape and charming 1930s House. Ocean Drive sat down with them at 1930s House (Thompson Miami Beach, 4041 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-397-8309) to roll back the years, and look into the future.

    What was the South Beach scene like when you first started visiting?
    Karim Masri:
    South Beach was off-limits my first year. It wasn’t safe. [Then] I remember in ’87, ’88, I went to a place called Scratch, and I ran into George Michael, and a year later there was Cindy Crawford. There was already some sort of a scene, and the [fashion] photography took it to another level.

    Coconut Grove was a big deal then. What allowed South Beach to surpass it?
    Nicola Siervo:
    The European factor—all the photo shoots were here. The fashion industry made it attractive to people, and it organically grew into a scene. If you have 500 models running around South Beach, you’re going to have people following. [Siervo shrugs to imply this is obvious.]

    Karim, you opened the Hotel Astor, which became pivotal in the hidden South Beach celeb scene, in 1995. What made that seem like a good venture at the time?
    KM:
    When you’re young, you take risks. I saw the progression; I felt it. To me, there was the beach, the weather, the fashion—there was a formula that was going to go crazy.

    South Beach shifted from a hidden boutique-ish nightlife scene to something more commercial. What was the turning point?
    KM:
    I think it was 1999—there was a Super Bowl that year, and Chris Paciello had a club where Set is. That’s when Cameron [Diaz] was doing Any Given Sunday, and the year before that, she did Something About Mary. The Super Bowl gave South Beach a window to the world that it never had before. The corporate world went to all the clubs, and all these places started to gain worldwide notoriety. We went from trendy-cool to being on the path to commercial.
    NS: And, of course, the real estate grew, and so forth.

    The rules of getting into clubs have certainly changed.
    NS:
    Before, there was a selection at the door based on looks and cool, not on money.
    KM: There were clubs like Nell’s in New York, where if the doorman didn’t like you, it didn’t matter; you could spend $10,000 and you wouldn’t get in.
    NS: The culture of clubbing moved to a bigger stage; now you can buy tickets online. It changed with the explosion of EDM.

    Bottle service had been around, but when did it really take hold?
    KM:
    The bottle thing started in the late ’90s—if there was a group of guys you wouldn’t normally let in, you’d say, “If you guys buy a bottle, I’ll get you in.” But the whole $5,000 and buy-your-way-in, I would say, [started] in the 2000s. It changed with the world. The world has created so much wealth in the last 15 years. Now money is being thrown to buy access.

    You study the hospitality industry and navigate it with great success. Any predictions?
    NS:
    We went from real club culture [of the ’90s] to big EDM explosion—the DJ is the rock star. We are not that kind of business. Our company will always be on the boutique side of things.
    KM: What we need not lose is that nightlife was an escape. Now for the younger generation, it’s about showing and documenting their lives—taking a selfie with some DJ behind [them]. It’s not about you enjoying the moment anymore.
    NS: Eventually we are going [to go] back. Small venues are coming back. That’s why we believe in this room [the 1930s House]. It’s the alternative to a club. I’m not saying big clubs will die, but the real club culture will probably go back to smaller venues.

    As you plan your next venture, what elements of Miami are you paying attention to?
    KM:
    For anything on the mainland side, I want to wait another six months to see how the dust settles, because the next war is retail. All these shopping malls opening—the Malaysian casino at the [former Miami Herald building], Squire with Brickell City Centre, Craig Robins with the Design District, whether Wynwood has the potential to be the Meatpacking District—Miami has tentacles in every direction.

    Any more thoughts on South Beach’s hospitality past and future?
    KM:
    In the past, it was a village. It was simple. People are trying too hard.
    NS: It was not so much showing off before.

    But that’s how you make your money—off of those people.
    NS:
    We don’t mind it. We love it, but if we could choose, sometimes I would be a little more like the past.
    KM: We have to make a living, and we love what we do because we keep that boutique-y essence. The people who work with us—it’s homegrown. Sure, I want a guy to spend $50,000, but that’s not what I would describe to you with nostalgia. We do this business because we love it—we love the music, the people, the food. KNR Hospitality Group, 1691 Michigan Ave., Ste. 325, Miami Beach, 305-695-0288


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    Miami is fun and games for the most part, but at some point your body needs a break. From a full-body detox and power nap to a massage that comes straight to your door, here are six Miami-appropriate remedies that are just what the doctored ordered.

    Reboot at The Miami Beach Edition

    EDITION Miami Beach

    Is the South Beach lifestyle getting the best of you? Miami’s swankiest and newest hotel offers the ultimate sanctuary for the mind, body, and soul at it's state-of-the-art spa where you can book the head-to-toe Reboot treatment; it starts with a full-body steam followed by a clay body mask, and that’s before anyone even touches you. After a head, scalp, and full-body massage, you'll end your treatment with a power nap add-on, which simulates four hours of sleep in just twenty minutes. 2901 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach, 786-257-4539

    Pure Meditation at Thompson Miami Beach

    Seagrape

    Having a hard time doing (and thinking) nothing? Unwind at Thompson’s rooftop and outdoor spa, and let local holistic wizard Modern Guru clear your mind with 60 minutes of guided mediation—it will help you let go of any negative thoughts and fill your body with positive energy. Once you’ve brought yourself back to the present, head downstairs to Michelle Bernstein’s Florida brasserie, Seagrape, for some much-needed nourishment. 4041 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 786-605-4093

    Ayurvedic Facial at Croydon Rose Spa & Apothecary

    croydon rose

    Facials can be dreadful (and painful), but what about one that doesn’t include extractions, but instead, releases all the stress and built-up tension we carry in our faces? That’s the premise behind the Ayurvedic facial at this rooftop healing oasis. The hour-long treatment cleanses and exfoliates the cutis with Ayurvedic products made of chickpea flowers and natural herbs. The facial concludes with a stimulating massage that targets marma points in the head and scalp, releasing blockages and increasing blood flow to the skin’s surface. 3720 Collins Ave, Miami Beach; 305-704-7448

    VitaSquad IV Infusions at Anatomy at 1220

    anatomy

    You won’t be totally sure whether you’re at LIV or the gym when you visit this members-only fitness club established by Miami nightlife veterans and sports scientists. The post-party hangout is also a place to recharge with massages, cold therapy, thermotherapy (eucalyptus steam and hot plunge), and IV vitamin infusions from VitaSquad, which has its own team of nurses ready to administer medical cocktails that boost immunity, optimize your fitness potential, or whatever else your body desires. 1220 20th St, Miami Beach, 786-213-1220

    Dead Sea Hair Mask at Symbols Beauty Salon

    symbols salon

    Miami’s humidity and strong sun can take a toll on your tresses, which is why the folks behind this downtown shrine have come up with the perfect cure. Its hair mask utilizes mud from the Dead Sea—the lowest point on earth and chockfull of minerals—to bring your hair back to life after what it endures every day. Say goodbye to frizz and hello to shine. 50 Biscayne Blvd., 305-371-5555

    Sports Massage by Soothe

    Soothe

    With so much going on in Miami, you sometimes need to stay in and hibernate. If you don't feel like changing out of your sweatpants, you can rest easy with Soothe. The massage delivery company promises an experienced therapist at your doorstep within the hour. Choose from deep tissue, Swedish, or the sports massage, which fuses all three and incorporates gentle stretching. 866-245-4264


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    To pay homage to its enduring legacy of luxury timepieces and immaculate design, Vacheron Constantin introduces Harmony, a new collection of watches to add to their lengthy repertoire.

    Harmony Calibre

    Vacheron Constantin Caliber 3300

    In honor of 260 years of continuous production—the longest of any manufacturer—Vacheron Constantin has unveiled a new line of timepieces under the banner name Harmony. The line will feature a cushion-shaped case and a design that is inspired by a yellow gold chronograph produced in 1928. However, the modern realization takes advantage of its case construction, curves, and lines to help reflect light—revealing multiple facets of the watch. Additionally, Vacheron Constantin has developed all new calibers for these watches, attesting to its dedication to perfection and excellence, which has fueled the brand for 260 years.

    Here, we present a quick overview of the initial line, which consists of both small and medium complications as well as a grande complication.

    Harmony Dual Time

    Harmony Dual Time

    Harmony Dual Time watches.

    Available in both pink and white gold, the Dual Time displays the second time zone at the four/five o’clock position and a day/night indicator at the seven. Using the Caliber 2460DT, this self-winding watch is comprised of 233 parts and features a decorated oscillating weight. This line will be limited to 625 pieces. Additionally, the Harmony Dual Time also comes in a smaller, diamond studded version that features the same movements as the larger model. Exactly 500 pieces of the smaller diamond version will be available.

    Harmony Chronograph

    Harmony Chronograph

    Harmony Chronograph with pulismeter.

    The 252-part, hand-wound Caliber 3300 drives the modern-day interpretation of the 1928 chronograph that inspired the line. The monopusher chronograph sports a pulsometric scale and comes in an 18-karat 5N pink gold case. The dual register dial features a 45-minute timer at three o’clock and a 60-second timer at nine o’clock. Similar to the Dual Time, the Chronograph will feature a smaller diamond studded version. However unlike the Dual Time, the smaller chronograph houses a different movement than its larger counterpart. The small model is powered by the Caliber 1142; the Harmony Chronograph Small features a dual register chronograph with a similar dial layout to its larger-sized sibling. Both sizes will be limited to 260 pieces each.

    Harmony Tourbillon Chronograph

    Tourbillon Chronograph

    Harmony Tourbillon Chronograph

    The Tourbillon Chronograph is a monopusher chronograph powered by the hand-wound Caliber 3200 and is housed in a platinum case. The dial layout displays a single register chronograph where the timer can be found at the three o’clock position. The Tourbillon escapement at the 12 o’clock offers stunning appeal. The chronograph timer is a 45-minute timer, which, when added to the monopusher function, makes for a rare-breed combination. The Tourbillon sports a robust 65 hours of power reserve, and will be highly limited in availability, with only 26 being created.

    Harmony Ultra-Thin Grande Complication Chronograph

    Complication Chronograph

    Harmony Ultra Thin Grande Complications Chronograph

    Out of the entire collection, the Ultra-Thin Grande Complication Chronograph will receive the most attention due to both the technical complexity of the piece, as well as the effort Vacheron Constantin has put into creating one of the thinnest self-winding split seconds chronograph movements on the market. Measuring 5.20 mm thick, the self-winding Caliber 3500 makes good on the claim. Cased, the watch measures a total thickness of 8.4 mm.

    Ultra Thin

    The superlative ultra-thin piece offers a 60-minute chronograph, a split second function for the chronograph, and a power reserve indicator. Some watch buffs may have an issue with the use of the word "grande" given the functions the watch offers; however, the combination of ultra-thin caliber and the monopusher split seconds chronograph is a vast achievement. It should be noted that, in typical Vacheron Constantin style, this venerable brand has meticulously hand-finished each of the 459 pieces that comprise the watch.

     

    Founder and editor-in-chief of ATimelyPerspective.com, Roberta Naas is a veteran award-winning journalist in the watch industry with more than 25 years of experience. She was the first woman watch editor in the US market—breaking in to an “all boys network” with a pioneering spirit that would be her signature to this day. Naas brings responsible, factual—yet always timely and insightful—reporting of the watch industry to the forefront.


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